CDE Detailed Report

Disease: Traumatic Brain Injury
Sub-Domain: Biomechanical Devices
CRF: Video Device Confirmation Form

Displaying 1 - 29 of 29
CDE ID CDE Name Variable Name Definition Short Description Question Text Permissible Values Description Data Type Disease Specific Instructions Disease Specific Reference Population Classification (e.g., Core) Version Number Version Date CRF Name (CRF Module / Guideline) Sub Domain Name Domain Name Size Input Restrictions Min Value Max Value Measurement Type External Id Loinc External Id Snomed External Id caDSR External Id CDISC
C58458 Video device verification method other text VidDevVeriMethdOTH The other specify field for method of verification (device-video vs. video-device) The other specify field for method of verification (device-video vs. video-device Method of cross-verifying video and device exposures: Alphanumeric

Data is best described when video and data correspond (option 3). The accelerometry device and video recording can independently capture exposure information and can be cross-verified to increase confidence of the exposure measurement. This CDE differentiates which set of information serves as the ground truth for verification. For example, if video is served as ground truth, exposures captured on video but not measured by the device would be considered as missing (false negatives). It is also an option to only consider exposures measured by both the video and the device to be 'verified' exposures. Please select from following options or, if another method is used, provide a detailed description of the method.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 14:13:32.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56789 Camera model type CamModelTyp The type of model that the camera being used is The type of model that the camera being used i Camera model: Alphanumeric

Please indicate model of video camera(s) used for recording event footage.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 13:56:33.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56801 Video device false negative count VidDevFalseNegCt The number of false negatives from the study, in which the video indicates an event with no corresponding device event within an allowable amount of time The number of false negatives from the study, in which the video indicates an event with no corresponding device event within an allowable amount of tim Number of false negative exposures Numeric Values

Head impact exposures observed on video but lacking corresponding device exposure data within the allowable time-period (Maximum Allowable DeltaT). Through careful review of the video, identify head impact exposures. The definition of this will vary by the sport setting studied but could include identifiable change in the head kinematics (in the case of a head impact in football for example) or an identifiable change in the ball trajectory (in the case of a head to soccer ball impact). It is highly suggested that this process be conducting by multiple coders blinded to each other's' efforts. Have a master coder reconcile any differences in exposure identification. Count the number of head impact exposures identified on video that do not have any corresponding data on the device within the allowable time-period.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 1.00 2017-07-24 15:35:44.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C56790 Camera resolution type CamResolnTyp The type of resolution being used by the camera The type of resolution being used by the camer Camera resolution: Alphanumeric

Please indicate resolution of video camera(s) used for recording event footage.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 13:57:09.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56803 Video device head to head positive impact count VidDevH2HPosImpactCt The number of true positive head to head impacts counted in the study through video The number of true positive head to head impacts counted in the study through vide Of the true positive exposures, number of confirmed head to head exposures: Numeric Values

The number of visually verified head impact events that resulted from head to head contact (including helmet to helmet contact).

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 1.00 2017-07-24 15:38:46.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C56791 Camera sample rate CamSampleRate The camera's sample rate The camera's sample rat Camera sample rate: Alphanumeric

Please indicate sample/frame rate of video camera(s) used for recording event footage.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 13:58:34.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56804 Video device head to body true positive impact count VidDevH2BTrPosImpactCt The number of true positive head to body impacts counted in the study through video The number of true positive head to body impacts counted in the study through vide Of the true positive exposures, number of confirmed head to body exposures Numeric Values

The number of visually verified head impact events that resulted from head to body contact (e.g., head contacts the torso of another person).

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 1.00 2017-07-24 15:38:46.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C56792 Camera position type CamPosTyp The type of position(s) the camera has been placed in The type of position(s) the camera has been placed i Camera positions: Alphanumeric

Please indicate positions of video camera(s) used for recording event footage.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 13:59:06.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56848 Video device head to ground true positive impact count VidDevH2GTrPosImpactCt The number of true positive head to ground impacts counted in the study The number of true positive head to ground impacts counted in the stud Of the true positive exposures, number of confirmed head to ground exposures: Numeric Values

The number of visually verified head impact events that resulted from head to ground contact (e.g., while falling or diving, head contacts playing surface).

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 1.00 2017-07-24 15:38:46.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C00008 Age value AgeVal Value for participant/subject's age, calculated as elapsed time since the birth of the participant/subject Value for participant/subject's age, calculated as elapsed time since the birth of the participant/subjec Subject age: Numeric Values

Years (derived from this data element)

Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 3.00 2013-08-28 16:08:00.453 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

Free-Form Entry

0 1800 month
C56793 Timestamp creation method type TimesCreMethdTyp The method used for timestamp creation The method used for timestamp creatio Method of timestamp creation: Alphanumeric

Please indicate method of creating timestamps on video footage. The approach used to generate a timestamp for each individual video frame used to verify impacts. The timestamp is the time of day of a given video frame which will be compared with the time of day an event is recorded via the device. The timestamp can be generated by the camera using an internal clock (e.g., a GPS synched clock, an internal software clock, etc.) or can be tracked using an external source (e.g., a digital clock in view of the camera, calibrating the frames using a digital clock shown a single time, etc.). These methods are not exclusive, and other approaches may be described.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 14:02:05.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56849 Video device head to object true positive impact count VidDevH2OTrPosImpactCt The number of true positive head to object impacts counted in the study by video The number of true positive head to object impacts counted in the study by vide Of the true positive exposures, number of confirmed head to object exposures: Numeric Values

The number of visually verified head impact events that resulted from head to object contact (e.g., head contacts the ball).

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 1.00 2017-07-24 15:38:46.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C06005 Data collected date and time DataCollDateTime Date (and time, if applicable and known) the data were collected. This may be the date/time a particular examination or procedure was performed Date (and time, if applicable and known) the data were collected. This may be the date/time a particular examination or procedure was performe Date of last event
Time of last event
Date or Date & Time

When date/time data are prepared for aggregation or sharing they should be converted to the format specified by ISO 8601, YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.

Record the date/time according to the ISO 8601, the International Standard for the representation of dates and times (http://www.iso.org/iso/home.html). The date/time should be recorded to the level of granularity known (e.g., year, year and month, complete date plus hours and minutes, etc.). Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 3.00 2013-07-24 21:00:23.88 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C56794 Video device time synchronization method type VidDevTimeSyncMethdTyp The method of time-synchronization between the video and the device The method of time-synchronization between the video and the devic Method of time-synchronization between video and sensor: Alphanumeric

The approach used to synchronize the timestamps of the device and video. Please choose or describe the method to synchronize video and device information. The time-synchronization between the device and video can be accomplished using several approaches. For example, both device and video could be synchronized with a third source (e.g., the NIST traceable time source time.gov, or localized computer time source), or they could be synchronized by forcing events on the devices in view of the camera and documenting any offsets in time. These methods are not exclusive, and other approaches may be described. The requested input is for a description of how the time-synchronization between the device and video was accomplished.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 14:06:05.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56850 Video device body true positive impact count VidDevBdyTrPosImpactCt The number of true positive body impacts counted in the study through video The number of true positive body impacts counted in the study through vide Of the true positive exposures, number of confirmed body exposures: Numeric Values

The number of visually verified events in which the person's body comes in contact with another person, the ground, or an object that result in an "acceleration event" of the head – without direct contact to the head.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 1.00 2017-07-24 15:38:46.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C17402 Site name SiteName The name of the site for the study The name of the site for the study Site Name: Alphanumeric Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 3.00 2013-06-21 00:00:00.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56795 Video device verification method type VidDevVeriMethdTyp The method of verification (device-video vs. video-device) The method of verification (device-video vs. video-device Method of cross-verifying video and device exposures: Device as ground truth;Video as ground truth;Only impacts/exposures verified in both device data and video are considered;Other specify Device as ground truth;Video as ground truth;Only impacts/exposures verified in both device data and video are considered;Other specify Alphanumeric

Data is best described when video and data correspond (option 3). The accelerometry device and video recording can independently capture exposure information and can be cross-verified to increase confidence of the exposure measurement. This CDE differentiates which set of information serves as the ground truth for verification. For example, if video is served as ground truth, exposures captured on video but not measured by the device would be considered as missing (false negatives). It is also an option to only consider exposures measured by both the video and the device to be 'verified' exposures. Please select from following options or, if another method is used, provide a detailed description of the method.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 14:13:32.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

Single Pre-Defined Value Selected

C56950 Video device analysis link method type other text VIdDevAnaLinkMethdTypOTH The free-text field related to 'Video device analysis link method type' specifying other text The free-text field related to 'Video device analysis link method type' specifying other tex Other, specify: Alphanumeric Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 14:56:38.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C19144 Activity description ActivityDescription Description of activity Description of activity Activity (Indicate all that pertain to subject): Alphanumeric

Please indicate all activities under study which pertain to the subject (e.g. football, soccer). Associated CDEs are C56787, C56855, and C56826.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2014-05-29 10:46:32.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 4000

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C56796 Video device analysis link method type VIdDevnaLinkMethdTyp The method of analysis/link (algorithm such as nearest neighbors after identifying all video and all sensor events independently vs. manual linking) The method of analysis/link (algorithm such as nearest neighbors after identifying all video and all sensor events independently vs. manual linking Method of analysis/link (algorithm): Maximize exposure timing correlation after identifying all video and all device impacts/exposure(s);Real-time stamp matching between video and device;Other, specify Maximize exposure timing correlation after identifying all video and all device impacts/exposure(s);Real-time stamp matching between video and device;Other, specify Alphanumeric

Exposures measured by the device and those observed in video need to be linked with each other for verification. For example, if a sports player was observed to sustain a head impact at 10:30:56 am on video while wearing an accelerometry device, it is expected that the accelerometry device will have a recording corresponding to this observation. The method to link the exposures could include 1) identifying the time differences between exposures in video or device and finding the time-syncing difference to maximize the correlation between the video exposure timings and device exposure timings, 2) having a timestamp for each exposure on the video or device that is synchronized with a standard real-time clock (e.g. nist.gov time) and correlating exposures via the real-time stamp. Please choose from the following options, or if another method is used, provide a detailed description of the method.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 14:56:38.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

Single Pre-Defined Value Selected

C56999 Data collected start date and time DtCllcStrtDateTime Date/Time of start of data collection Date/Time of start of data collection Date of first event
Time of first event
Date or Date & Time

When date/time data are prepared for aggregation or sharing they should be converted to the format specified by ISO 8601, YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.

Record the date/time according to the ISO 8601, the International Standard for the representation of dates and times (http://www.iso.org/iso/home.html). The date/time should be recorded to the level of granularity known (e.g., year, year and month, complete date plus hours and minutes, etc.). Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-12-04 14:50:18.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C19247 Subject ID SubIDNam Subject identification ID Subject identification ID Subject ID: Alphanumeric Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2014-06-05 13:10:49.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56797 Video device maximum allowable delta t value VidDevMaxAllowDeltaTVal The maximum allowable DeltaT value for the study The maximum allowable DeltaT value for the stud Maximum allowable DeltaT (DeltaT- amount of time between an identified sensor/video event): Numeric Values

Where DeltaT is the amount of time between an identified device/video exposure(s). Due to uncertainties in real-time stamps or time offset calculations, the timing of individual exposures may not have an exact match between video and device. For example, if there is a +/- one second uncertainty in the timestamp, it is possible that a video exposure at 12:30:45 may be matched with a device exposure at 12:30:46. This CDE specifies the amount of tolerance allowed for the difference between video and device time stamps. Indicate time offset in number of seconds between video and device time stamps allowed for linking exposures.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 15:02:43.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

Free-Form Entry

millisecond
C57028 Timestamp device video synchronization resolution error duration TimesDevVidSynResolErrDur The resolution time for time-synchronization between video and device or the amount of error allowed between device timestamp and video timestamp The resolution time for time-synchronization between video and device or the amount of error allowed between device timestamp and video timestamp Resolution of time-synchronization between video and device: (e.g. +/- second, +/- millisecond) Numeric Values

Resolution of time-synchronization is the amount of error allowed between the device timestamp and video timestamp. Appropriate answers for this would be ±1second, ±1millisecond, etc. The resolution will depend on the accuracy of the device clock and the accuracy of the video clock (e.g., if the device timestamp is accurate to the millisecond, and the video timestamp is accurate to the second the resolution would be ±1second). Please indicate time resolution of time-synchronization between the video and the device. For example, if both video and device has 1 second resolution for their real-time stamps, the time resolution would be 1 second.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-12-12 11:41:05.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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millisecond
C22780 Date time clock type DateTimeClockTyp Type of clock used to record date and time Type of clock used to record date and tim am;PM;24-hour clock am;PM;24-hour clock Alphanumeric Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2016-10-27 12:24:17.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

Single Pre-Defined Value Selected

C56798 Video device true positive impact count VidDevTruePosImpactCt The number of true positive impacts, in which both the video and the device indicate an event happened within a small window of time The number of true positive impacts, in which both the video and the device indicate an event happened within a small window of tim Number of true positive exposures (Both video and sensor indicate an event happened within small window of time): Numeric Values

Both video and device indicate an exposure(s)- happened within the allowable time-period (Maximum Allowable DeltaT). Head impact events in which both the video and the device indicate an exposure. Through careful review of the video, identify head impact exposures. The definition of this will vary by the sport setting studied but could include identifiable change in the head kinematics (in the case of a head impact in football for example) or an identifiable change in the ball trajectory (in the case of a head to soccer ball impact). It is highly suggested that this process be conducting by multiple coders blinded to each other's' efforts. Have a master coder reconcile any differences in exposure identification. Count the number of head impact events recorded on the device that can be confirmed via video. This may be tied to g-force level (e.g., impact as 25g+).

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 15:08:43.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C57029 Video device unclassified impact count VidDevUnclassImpactCt The number of events that were unable to be classified through video The number of events that were unable to be classified through vide Number of events that were unable to be classified Numeric Values

These could include those events where there is device data but video data is not available (e.g. player out of frame, etc).

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental 1.00 2017-12-12 15:37:21.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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C56788 Camera manufacturer name CameraManufacname The name of the camera manufacturer The name of the camera manufacture Camera manufacturer: Alphanumeric

Please indicate manufacturer of video camera(s) used for recording event footage.

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 13:55:16.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events 255

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C56799 Video device false positive count VidDevFalsePosCt The number of false positives from the study, in which the device indicated an event with no verification via video within an allowable amount of time The number of false positives from the study, in which the device indicated an event with no verification via video within an allowable amount of tim Number of false positive exposures (sensor indicated an event with no verification via video within an allowable amount of time): Numeric Values

Head impact exposures recorded on the device but unable to be verified by video within the allowable time-period (Maximum Allowable DeltaT). Through careful review of the video, identify head impact exposures. The definition of this will vary by the sport setting studied but could include identifiable change in the head kinematics (in the case of a head impact in football for example) or an identifiable change in the ball trajectory (in the case of a head to soccer ball impact). It is highly suggested that this process be conducting by multiple coders blinded to each other's' efforts. Have a master coder reconcile any differences in exposure identification. Count the number of head impact exposures recorded on the device that cannot be confirmed via video. This should only include those events in which the player for whom the exposure is recorded is visible on the video. It should not include unverifiable exposures out of frame of the video. This may be tied to g-force level (e.g., impact as 25g+).

Cortes N, Lincoln AE, Myer GD, Hepburn L, Higgins M, Putukian M. Video Analysis Verification of Head Impact Events Measured by Wearable Sensors. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;45:2379-2387.<br /><br />Kuo C, Wu LC, Loza J, Senif D, Anderson S, Camarillo DB. Comparison of video-based and sensor-based head impact exposure. bioRxiv 235432. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/235432 Adult;Pediatric Supplemental-Highly Recommended 1.00 2017-07-24 15:25:59.0 Video Device Confirmation Form Biomechanical Devices Disease/Injury Related Events

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