of0
Export
NINDS CDE Notice of Copyright
Test of Memory and Learning Revised (TOMAL-2)
Availability
Please visit this website for more information about the instrument: Test of Memory and Learning Revised (TOMAL-2)
Classification
Supplemental: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
 
Exploratory: Sport-Related Concussion (SRC)
Short Description of Instrument
Abstract Visual Memory
Faces
Stories
Word List Learning
Selective Reminding Test
Short Description of Instrument
Author(s): Cecil R. Reynolds, Ph.D. & Erin D. Bigler
 
TOMAL-2 provides the most comprehensive coverage of memory assessment currently available in a standardized battery. This assessment permits a direct comparison across a variety of aspects of memory in a single battery. This allows the assessment of strengths and weaknesses, as well as potentially pathologic indicators of memory disturbances. This nationally standardized test evaluates general specific memory functions using eight core subtests, six supplementary subtests and 2 delayed recall tasks.
 
TOMAL-2 is useful for evaluating children or adults referred for learning disabilities, traumatic brain injury, neurological diseases, serious emotional disturbances and ADHD.
 
Administration: Time: Core Battery - 30 minutes; Core Battery plus Supplementary - 60 minutes
 
Ages/Grades: Ages: 5-0 through 59-11
 
Sport-Related Concussion Specific:
 
Advantages: TOMAL-2 provides the most comprehensive coverage of memory assessment currently available in a standardized battery. This assessment permits a direct comparison across a variety of aspects of memory in a single battery. This allows the assessment of strengths and weaknesses, as well as potentially pathologic indicators of memory disturbances. This nationally standardized test evaluates general specific memory functions using eight core subtests, six supplementary subtests and 2 delayed recall tasks.
Scoring
Scores/Interpretation: Core Indexes include: Verbal Memory, Nonverbal Memory and Composite Memory. Supplementary Indexes include Verbal Delayed Recall, Learning, Attention and Concentration, Sequential Memory, Free Recall and Associative Recall. Includes standardized or scaled scores and percentiles. Subtest scaled scores appear as M = 10, SD = 3. Composite scores and indexes are M = 100, SD = 15.
References
Reynolds, C., and Voress, J. (2007). Test of Memory and Learning--Revised (Second ed.). Pearson Assessments: San Antonio, TX.
 
Alexander A & Mayfield J. Latent factor structure of the Test of Memory and Learning in a pediatric traumatic brain injured sample: support for a general memory construct. Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2005;20(5):587‒598.
 
Lowther J & Mayfield J. Memory functioning in children with traumatic brain injuries: a TOMAL validity study. Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2004;19(1):105‒118.
 
Ramsay M & Reynolds C. Separate digits tests: A brief history, a literature review, and a reexamination of the factor structure of the Test of Memory and Learning (TOMAL). Neuropsychol Rev. 995; 5(3):151‒171.
 
Reynolds C & Bigler E. Factor structure, factor indexes, and other useful statistics for interpretation of the Test of Memory and Learning (TOMAL). Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 1996;11(1):29–43.
 
Lajiness-O'Neill R, Erdodi L, Bigler ED. Memory and learning in pediatric traumatic brain injury: a review and examination of moderators of outcome. Applied Neuropsychol. 2010;17(2):83‒92.
 
Thaler NS, Barney SJ, Reynolds CR, Mayfield J, Allen DN. Differential sensitivity of TOMAL subtests and index scores to pediatric traumatic brain injury. Applied Neuropsychol. 2011;18(3):168‒178.
 
mTBI:
McCauley SR, Wilde EA, Anderson VA, Bedell G, Beers SR, Campbell TF, Chapman SB, Ewing-Cobbs L, Gerring JP, Gioia GA, Levin HS, Michaud LJ, Prasad MR, Swaine BR, Turkstra LS, Wade SL, Yeates KO; Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup.Recommendations for the use of common outcome measures in pediatric traumatic brain injury research. J Neurotrauma. 2012;29(4):678‒705.
 
Sport-Related Concussion:
Kontos AP, Elbin RJ 3rd, Covassin T, Larson E. Exploring differences in computerized neurocognitive concussion testing between African American and White athletes. Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2010;25(8):734‒744.
Page 1 of 1