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Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life (CP QOL)
Availability
Please visit this website for more information about the instrument:  Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life (CP QOL)
Classification
Supplemental – Highly Recommended: Cerebral Palsy (CP)
Short Description of Instrument
CEREBRAL PALSY QUALITY OF LIFE FOR CHILDREN (CP QOL-CHILD V2) AND CEREBRAL PALSY QUALITY OF LIFE FOR TEENS (CP QOL-TEEN V2). CP QOL is a condition-specific
measure of quality of life – assessment of wellbeing across various domains of life. Four tools exist:
  1. CP QOL – Child V2 is a self-report tool for children aged 9 to 12
  2. CP QOL – Child V2 parent/proxy report version for children aged 4 to 12 years,
  3. CP QOL – Teen V2 is self-report for adolescents aged 13 to 18 years, and
CP QOL – Teen V2 - parent/proxy report for for adolescents aged 13 to 18 years.
Comments/Special Instructions
Children and adolescents with cerebral palsy aged 4–18 years. Good to excellent test retest reliability and internal consistency. Good construct validity. Tested exclusively with children and adolesents with CP.
Scoring
Depending on whether the version is proxy or self-report, quality of life is measured on up to 7 domains. CP QOL- Child (Davis et al., 2010; Waters et al., 2013) covers social wellbeing and acceptance, feelings about functioning, participation and physical health, emotional wellbeing and self-esteem, pain and impact of disability; with access to services and family health only being completed by proxy reporters.
CP QOL-Child. 65 items
CPQOL-Child (proxy). 53 items, takes approx. 15–20 mins to complete. CPQOL-Teen. 72 items
CPQOL-Teen (proxy). 89 items
Most items are in the form: How do you think your child feel about..” with a 9-point rating scale (1=very unhappy to 9= very happy). Item scores are transformed to a 0– 100 scale and are averaged for each domain. The manual provides details for this process. Norms are not include in the manual.
Rationale/Justification
Rigourously developed speicifically for cerebral palsy including being based on grounded theory including interviews with children with CP, thus considered to possess content (face) validity (Carlon et al., 2010). Considered to be a stronger option for condition-specific measures of quality of life (Carlon et al., 2010).
Questions are phrased to measure well-being (not ill-being). (Carlon et al., 2010).
References
CP QOL Research Team. Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life (CP QOL) Melborne, Australia: University of Melbourne; 2013 [cited 2016 28 June]. Available from: http://www.cpqol.org.au/what_is_cp.html
 
Carlon S, Shields N, Yong K, Gilmore R, Sakzewski L, Boyd R. A systematic review of the psychometric properties of Quality of Life measures for school aged children with cerebral palsy. BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:81.
 
Davis E, Shelly A, Waters E, Davern M. Measuring the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy: comparing the conceptual differences and psychometric properties of three instruments. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2010;52(2):174–180.
 
Davis E; Mackinnon A; Davern M; Boyd R; Bohanna I; Waters E; H.K Graham; Reid S; Reddihough D. Description and psychometric properties of the CP QOL-Teen: a quality of life questionnaire for adolescents with cerebral palsy. Res Dev Disab.
2013;34:344–335.
 
Davis E, Waters E, Boyd R, Reddihough D, Reid S, Graham HK, Mackinnon A, Lo SK, Stevenson R, Bjornson K, Blair E, Hoare P, Ravens-Sieberer U. Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaires & Manuals Melbourne Australia: University of Melbourne; 2013 [cited 2016 05 Jan]. Available from: http://www.cpqol.org.au/questionnaires_manuals.html.
 
Waters E, Davis E, Mackinnon A, Boyd R, Graham HK, Kai Lo S, Wolfe R, Stevenson R, Bjornson K, Blair E, Hoare P, Ravens-Sieberer U, Reddihough D. Psychometric properties of the quality of life questionnaire for children with CP. Dev Med Child
Neurol. 2007;49(1):49–55.
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